BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

How reliable is the gait lab in your pocket?

in Knee injuries, Tools and technology

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) plagues up to 17% of runners who complain of knee pain(1). Often weak gluteus medius muscles are to blame with resulting hip adduction (HADD) and positive Trendelenburg sign during the unilateral stance phase of running. Patellofemoral pain also affects knee flexion (KFLEX) in single stance, with runners avoiding KFLEX to prevent pain.... MORE

Plantaris tendon: the nuisance bystander?

in Diagnose & Treat, Leg injuries

The plantaris muscle and tendon are considered unnecessary for the biomechanical function of the lower limb. Yet this benign muscle can cause problems if ruptured or involved in a medial Achilles tendon injury. Chris Mallac explains why, and how to manage an injury to either. The plantaris muscle (PM) is a small, thin, and spindle-shaped muscle... MORE

6 recommendations for the treatment of hip pain

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Hip pain in active adults is common. Between 30% to 40% of adult athletes report chronic hip pain(1,2).  Hip pain doesn’t just affect athletes. The number of adults in the general population diagnosed with femoroacetabular impingement is 10% to 15%(3). Many with hip pain seek the help of a physiotherapist. Therefore, in 2017 a group... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Proximal hamstring rupture – act sooner rather...

in Anatomy, Leg injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac looks at the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for proximal hamstring ruptures in athletes. Although an uncommon form of hamstring damage (only eight to 12% of all hamstring injuries), an untreated rupture at the muscle origin leads to significant functional debilitation(1-3). The actual incidence of undiagnosed rupture may be much higher, thus accounting... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Don’t play with groin pain – femoral...

in Diagnose & Treat, Hip injuries, Uncommon injuries

Although relatively uncommon in athletes, the risk of a femoral neck stress fracture is nevertheless significant, especially in females. Andrew Hamilton explains the etiology of this debilitating injury, factors that aid a rapid and accurate diagnosis, and the nutritional defecits associated with its development. First reported by Asalin, a German military surgeon in 1905, a... MORE

Neuroplasticity in sports injury rehabilitation: Part I

in Anatomy, Improve

In the first part of a 2-part article, Chris Mallac explores the concept of neuroplasticity, and how a better understanding of its underlying principles improves rehab outcomes. Reinjury rates following return to sport are often quite high. In under-25 athletes for example, the incidence of another anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture (or ACL failure) run... MORE

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