BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Alicia Filley

ALICIA FILLEY PT, MS., editor and long-time contributor to Sports Injury Bulletin and its sister publication Peak Performance, has 30 years’ experience working in rehabilitation, sports injury and sports performance. She holds both a bachelor's and a master's degree in physical therapy.

When not writing and researching, Alicia can be found putting her findings to the test outside on the trail and inside the gym. An avid hiker, Alicia is the founder of The Healthy Hiker, a program that trains women to conquer their dream trail. Learn more at www.TheHealthyHiker.com. Her most recent achievement is hiking the Grand Canyon from rim to rim. Connect with her on Twitter @AliciaFilley or Facebook @AliciaFilleyPT.



Articles by Alicia Filley

Representation in sports research: are girls just one of...

in Email Newsletters, Other

The inauguration of the United States’ first female vice president marks another example of the windows of opportunity opening to women in all aspects of society. One hallmark moment for female athletes was Title IX’s inclusion as part of the Education Amendments passed in the US in 1972. This amendment prohibited discrimination on the basis... MORE

How to assess running kinematics without a fancy 3D...

in Email Newsletters, Improve

In any given year, nearly 80% of runners will report a running-related injury (RRI). Hip weakness and faulty kinematics are frequently implicated in injuries such as iliotibial band syndrome and medial tibial stress syndrome. However, without a high-tech running lab, clinicians have few resources to analyze running form. Therefore, a group of researchers from Montana... MORE

A consensus on surgical versus conservative management of ACL...

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Anterior cruciate ligament injuries remain one of the most common sports injuries(1). While sports injury science has made strides toward understanding the causes of injury and prevention strategies, many young athletes still suffer from ACL tears and ruptures. In 2019, sports professionals from various disciplines gathered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to reach a consensus on the... MORE

Why you should plan rehab programs for athletes differently

in Email Newsletters, Improve

There are two reasons why clinicians should consider rehabilitating athletes differently than other individuals. Firstly, athletes are already highly trained with muscular adaptations for their sport. Secondly, they desire to return to a level of performance beyond community-based activity. Therefore, they start with a baseline of strength beyond most individuals, and they need to return... MORE

Conservative management of hip avulsion injuries

in Other

In the December 2020 issue of Sports Injury Bulletin, Andrew Hamilton explored the use of imaging in the diagnosing hip and pelvic avulsion injuries and the role it plays in monitoring and managing recovery. Imaging helps make appropriate management choices since avulsions with more than 1.5cm of separation respond best to surgical repair(1). Clinicians typically... MORE

The role of neuromuscular function in ACL recovery

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears remain one of the most common sports injuries. These injuries typically happen in young athletes dooming them to an 80% chance of developing osteoarthritis (OA) as soon as 10 years after the injury(1,2). Thus, ACL injuries can contribute to life-long disability, with nearly half of those injured never returning to... MORE

Measuring cardiorespiratory fitness in youth

in Email Newsletters, Improve

Children are pushed at younger ages to specialize in a sport and play at an elite (for their age) level. While kids of the same age remain roughly on the same ability level as children, performance gaps become more noticeable as they approach adolescence. It seems obvious that the bigger kids are for their age,... MORE

Dancing to a different tune in return to sport...

in Email Newsletters

Dancers are a very elite and specialized kind of athlete. While considered an art form, dance requires a significant amount of athleticism. As such, dancers are prone to athletic injuries, just like other athletes. However, without a personal background in dance, clinicians may be left scratching their heads to determine when dancers are ready to... MORE

Follow us