BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Alicia Filley

ALICIA FILLEY PT, MS., editor and long-time contributor to Sports Injury Bulletin and its sister publication Peak Performance, has 30 years’ experience working in rehabilitation, sports injury and sports performance. She holds both a bachelor's and a master's degree in physical therapy.

When not writing and researching, Alicia can be found putting her findings to the test outside on the trail and inside the gym. An avid hiker, Alicia is the founder of The Healthy Hiker, a program that trains women to conquer their dream trail. Learn more at www.TheHealthyHiker.com. Her most recent achievement is hiking the Grand Canyon from rim to rim. Connect with her on Twitter @AliciaFilley or Facebook @AliciaFilleyPT.



Articles by Alicia Filley

Post COVID-19 return to sport: an update II

in Email Newsletters, Improve

With today’s announcement by Louisiana State University’s head football coach Ed Ogeron that ‘most’ of the team has contracted the novel coronavirus, we’ve yet to realize the impact of COVID-19 on athletes fully. Seventy-five of the Texas Tech football team players have also gotten the virus since returning to school for the fall season. While... MORE

Driving a wedge between orthotics and illiotibial band strain

in Hip injuries, Knee injuries

Illiotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a common disorder amongst recreational and competitive runners. In fact, it ranks only behind patellofemoral pain syndrome in frequency(1). The iliotibial band (ITB), a tough band of connective tissue that runs from the hip to the lateral knee, serves as the attachment for the gluteus maximus and the tensor fascia... MORE

Beliefs and barriers to injury prevention in recreational runners

in Email Newsletters, Improve, Prevent

Nearly 85% of runners experience a running injury in their lifetime(1). While researchers continue to look for exact mechanisms of injury in runners, a group from the Netherlands investigated the factors that make an injury prevention program successful(1). They undertook a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a multifactorial online prevention program for recreational... MORE

Fall in: What military studies reveal about injury prevention

in Email Newsletters, Prevent

Injury prevention goes hand in hand with rehabilitation science. Injuries cost athletes and sports teams lost time and money. While most injury prevention studies are conducted on athletes, a review of US Marine Corp recruits sheds light on one aspect of injury prevention that deserves more consideration. The Marines offer a unique setting in that... MORE

Hop to it: adding a single-leg vertical hop to...

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears continue to plague athletes in greater numbers each year(1). Unlike some athletic injuries, ACL tears, once healed or repaired, continue to impact future physical activity and joint health. A majority of athletes (around 60%) never return to a competitive level of sport(1). While there may be several reasons for this,... MORE

Beyond hamstring curls: effective recruitment with hip extension and...

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Prevent

Studies looking at muscle activation often rely on surface electromyography (sEMG) readings to determine muscle functionality. New technology, however, enables scientists to get a more accurate picture of muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a better measurement of muscle activation by recording the T2 relaxation time of tissue water. Scientists from Australia used... MORE

3 things to watch for in athletes with femoroacetabular...

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) primarily strikes young male athletes. The syndrome is often best managed with surgical correction. However, it’s important to understand how FAI affects the biomechanics of those who try a conservative approach. Researchers at Marquette University realized that gait assessment alone doesn’t mimic the extreme hip motion needed in sport(1). Therefore, they enrolled... MORE

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