BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Overuse injuries

Pronator teres: the carpal tunnel pretender

in Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Elbow and arm injuries, Hand injuries, Overuse injuries

Pronator trees syndrome is a relatively ‘uncommon injury’. In his continuing series, Chris Mallac describes the anatomy and biomechanics of this condition, provides diagnostic guidelines, and shares ideas on how clinicians can manage athletes with this ‘uncommon injury’. Entrapment of the median nerve (MN) between the two heads of the pronator teres muscle (PTM) can lead to... MORE

Text neck and the curse of thoracic dysfunction

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Neck and back injuries, Overuse injuries

Trevor Langford explores the biomechanical demands of the thoracic spine, provides examination and assessment guidelines and outlines methods for improving thoracic mobility. Thoracic spinal or mid back pain is a common complaint among a wide range of age groups within the general population, with adolescents and the elderly alike reporting pain. Shoulder biomechanics can be affected... MORE

Tendinopathy: new thinking on an old problem

in Diagnose & Treat, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries

Treating tendinopathy injuries is a complex and delicate skill for the sports physiotherapist. Recent research advances have provided new insights into understanding this condition and providing better management principles, but there is still a lack of gold-standard clinically supported recommendations. Tracy Ward explores recent findings and draws comparisons. Tendinopathy is the most common overuse injury in... MORE

Understanding injury: back to the class room

in Acute injuries, Diagnose & Treat, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries

Science has been described as the ‘systematic classification of experience’. With that in mind, David Joyce presents up-to-date knowledge surrounding muscle injuries and their classification. As he explains, by being armed with this information, clinicians can be better equipped to move more rapidly along the road of evidence-based prevention and rehabilitation programming MORE

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