BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Sports psychology

Autoregulation: The solution to the rehab programming puzzle

in Improve, Other, Power development, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Speed development, Sports psychology

Rehabilitation programs aim to recondition the injured tissue site to be pain-free and cope with the physical demands of the sport. Jason Tee delves into using autoregulation in exercise prescription to create robust athletes. Training prescription is a delicate balancing act of tissue-loading. Overload a client, and they may suffer setbacks in the form of... MORE

Deep breathe in, better performance out: can breathing and...

in Sports psychology

Athletes may experience fear avoidance when exposed to an unpleasant physical or cognitive experience. The perception of their experience may lead to anxiety and stress dysfunctions. Breathing and mindfulness techniques can minimize an athletes’ psychological perceptions, but can these components enhance sports performance? Tracy Ward looks at using breathwork and mindfulness to improve performance. Cleveland... MORE

Winning at all costs: mind over matter

in Email Newsletters, Improve, Other, Sports psychology

Mental health continues to gather the attention it deserves. The travel and sporting event restrictions, e.g., participation bubbles, place athletes and support personnel in unprecedented situations. In addition, the social disconnect places strain on the relationships that are paramount for mental health, and thus performance. Emotion fogs the nuance around performance. As athletes fight for... MORE

State of mind: Understanding cognitive load in performance and...

in Sports psychology

What makes an athlete’s motor skills fail when they need them most? Jason Tee investigates this phenomenon and reveals surprising and important implications for performance, injury prevention, and rehabilitation.  In the 1993 Wimbledon women’s final, Croatian sensation Jana Novotna led Steffi Graf 6-7, 6-1, 4-1, and required a single service point to go into a... MORE

Improving compliance with injury prevention programs

in Prevent, Sports psychology

Lack of compliance with injury prevention programs impacts their effectiveness. Jason Tee outlines how to improve buy-in and keep athletes off the injured list.   Athletes want to spend their time training effectively. They often fail to see the benefit of injury prevention activities when they don’t contribute to improved performance. The importance of injury... MORE

Good talk: why verbal feedback matters

in Improve, Sports psychology

Trevor Langford explores practical methods for assessing specific sporting movements, and how appropriate feedback can help an athlete improve movement quality. Athletes frequently train under stress and fatigue, which can lead to low motivation and poorly executed techniques(1). Fortunately, verbal and kinematic feedback related to technique execution enhances performance in athletes who are less conscientious(2).... MORE

4 necessary traits for building better patient/clinician relationships

in Improve, Sports psychology

A therapist’s interaction plays a critical role in patient outcomes. Trevor Langford explores how clinicians can embrace interpersonal aspects of clinical practice to enhance their patient’s rehabilitation experience. Being in pain, out of work, or away from training can be both physically and psychologically debilitating and detrimentally affect a client’s entire well-being and lifestyle. An alliance... MORE

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