BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

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Walk it off! Guidelines for preventing overdiagnosis

in Ankle and foot injuries, Email Newsletters, Improve, Prevent

The British Journal of Medicine published two interesting articles this month. The first is an education review on the overdiagnosis and medicalization of athletes (and the public at large)(1). The authors cite several factors supporting this trend in sports medicine, including: The belief that more intervention improves outcomes. Making the definition of disease more inclusive.... MORE

Taking a crack at groin pain

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Groin pain accounts for up to 30% of all sports injuries(1). Treating this ailment requires careful sleuthing from the sports injury clinician. The list of differential diagnoses to consider for groin pain is lengthy, including: Hip, pelvic, or knee joint pathology Bone pathology Tendon or ligament strain Muscle belly strain or tear Sports hernia Abdominal... MORE

Giving recovery the squeeze

in Email Newsletters, Improve, Tools and technology

Some time ago, editor Alicia Filley explored the effectiveness of graded compression garments (GCGs) on athletic performance and recovery for our sister publication Peak Performance. As she explained, the theory behind the use of GCGs by athletes stems from the regular application of their usage in the medical field. In hospitals, GCGs are worn by... MORE

Patellofemoral pain: sorted!

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) affects one in six adults with complaints of knee pain(1). What causes PFP remains equivocal. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to anterior knee pain. The elusive origins of PFP may be the reason that 40% of people affected lack significant improvement after a year of treatment(1). Researchers at the University of... MORE

Got runners? Chances are good you’ve got injuries too!

in Email Newsletters

  They defined RRIs to include, “any self-reported complaint involving muscles, joints, tendons, and/or bones deemed by the runner to be caused by running.” The RRI had to impact at least one running workout by requiring the runner to decrease their speed, distance, length of run, or the number of runs. In addition to RRIs,... MORE

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