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Beyond hamstring curls: effective recruitment with hip extension and...

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Prevent

Studies looking at muscle activation often rely on surface electromyography (sEMG) readings to determine muscle functionality. New technology, however, enables scientists to get a more accurate picture of muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a better measurement of muscle activation by recording the T2 relaxation time of tissue water. Scientists from Australia used... MORE

3 things to watch for in athletes with femoroacetabular...

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) primarily strikes young male athletes. The syndrome is often best managed with surgical correction. However, it’s important to understand how FAI affects the biomechanics of those who try a conservative approach. Researchers at Marquette University realized that gait assessment alone doesn’t mimic the extreme hip motion needed in sport(1). Therefore, they enrolled... MORE

Growing Pains: Osgood-Schlatter Disease

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Adolescence is often a period of rapid growth for most children. Because bones grow faster than muscles, this growth can lead to tension from the tendons at their insertion on the bone, causing an apophysitis. One of the most difficult-to-treat conditions related to such growth is Osgood-Schlatter Disease (OSD), an apophysitis at the tibial tuberosity.... MORE

Do injury prevention programs work for women?

in Email Newsletters, Prevent

More women are playing soccer than ever before. In fact, the rate of females joining soccer teams is outpacing the growth of all other sports(1). Injuries from playing soccer are on the rise as well. According to the NCAA, injuries occurred in collegiate female soccer players between 2004 and 2009, at a rate of 7.3... MORE

Does the hip control the knee?

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Knee injuries are the bane of athletes in nearly all sports (see figure 1)(1). Clinicians and sports scientists continue to explore the best way to prevent such injuries. The knee, a hinge joint, moves in the sagittal plane. The thought is that most knee injuries occur from forced movement in the frontal plane. Therefore, control... MORE

When the world is heavy: the impact of...

in Email Newsletters, Improve

The NCAA reported that there were 81,096 black college athletes during the 2018-2019 academic year(1). These numbers represent 16% of the college athlete population(1). The majority of these athletes play men’s and women’s basketball and men’s football. Of course, many of these go on to play in professional sports. The number of high-school and younger... MORE

Address these 4 things to improve patient outcomes

in Email Newsletters, Improve

All therapists like to think that they provide the magic touch that gets their patients better. However, when considering all social determinants of health, the influence of medical interventions toward recovery from musculoskeletal injury is only 20%(1). You put your best effort into helping patients get better, but your effectiveness is up against other competing... MORE

Post-COVID-19 return to sport: an update

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters

Athletes are slowly returning to sport with the lifting of restrictions, as evidenced by the comeback of the Bundesliga and NASCAR this past weekend. Some of these athletes may have previously tested positive for the novel coronavirus or may contract it as their social interaction increases. Therefore, it’s essential to understand the latest guidelines concerning... MORE

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