BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Email Newsletters

Cool it! Why cryotherapy may not get desired results...

in Email Newsletters, Tools and technology

A recent newsletter explored the effect of post-exercise cryotherapy on the uptake of protein in muscles. While the immediate use of cooling after resistance exercise might diminish muscle building, it is a common strategy used to decrease delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) after endurance exercise. Muscle cooling post-exercise comes in many forms: Cold water immersion... MORE

Cold water immersion cools muscle growth

in Email Newsletters, Improve

When training athletes, resistance training should be executed with the same zeal and importance as skill and endurance training. However, this is rarely the case. Athletes tend to enjoy playing the sport the most and therefore gravitate toward drills and endurance play. Some find being stuck in the weight room boring and fail to see... MORE

The 4 mechanism of shoulder injuries in rugby union...

in Email Newsletters, Shoulder injuries

A significant aspect of sports injury prevention is understanding the mechanism of injury. Knowing how the damage occurs leads to the development of strategies, such as increased strength or flexibility, which help the athlete either avoid the injury situation or cope with the incident in a better way. Researchers in Dublin sought such information regarding... MORE

Run of the mill injuries for track and field...

in Email Newsletters, Improve, Tools and technology

Common sense tells us that athletes who play certain sports tend to suffer particular injuries. However, we lack the data to substantiate which athletes have more particular injury prevention needs. A group of researchers from France undertook the monumental task of surveying the injuries from international track and field championships and categorizing them according to... MORE

Is playing soccer bad for your brain?

in Email Newsletters, Improve

Soccer is the world’s most-played sport. More than 265 million people play soccer each year(1). The number of soccer-related injuries is growing along with the numbers of players. Nearly one-quarter of these injuries are concussions. Of these, almost one-third are related to heading the ball. The rest of the injuries are the result of player-to-player... MORE

Treat the film or the feeling – a review...

in Email Newsletters, Improve

Recreational running is simultaneously held to be the savior of our inactive population and the cause of most musculoskeletal woes. Which is true?  Two late-2019 studies present interesting perspectives on this issue. The first, conducted by the Department of Sports Medicine at Goethe University in Frankfurt, surveyed 720 runners participating in a corporate-sponsored 3.5-mile run(1).... MORE

5 ways to reduce muscle loss while injured

in Email Newsletters, Improve

The significant economic impact of athletic injury results from both the direct medical expenses and lost time in play. The personal costs of injury include psychological stress and loss of physical fitness. Muscle atrophy and strength loss from inactivity require more rehabilitation and impact return to play performance. For instance, knee injuries, one of the... MORE

Gait deviations and running injuries: chicken or the egg?

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters

Injuries plague roughly half of all runners(1). The most common of these injuries include patellofemoral pain (PFP), iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), and Achilles tendinopathy (AT). Certain musculoskeletal deficits are associated with these running injuries. However, researchers at the University of Salford wondered if there were universal running gait deviations that... MORE

Follow us