BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

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Made to move

in Email Newsletters, Sports psychology

The World Trade Center. A Madrid train. The London subway. Charlie Hebdo. Paris, San Bernadino, Boston, Belgium, Orlando, Nice, Westminster, St. Petersburg, Stockholm, Manchester, Las Vegas, Barcelona. Sadly, no place is immune to the effects of terror. It’s a reality that unites us all. However, there’s a greater bond that we all share, no matter... MORE

Getting ahead with a concussion

in Acute injuries, Email Newsletters, Sports psychology

Concussion injuries remain in the news, particularly concerning those that result from American football. Reason being, many players suffer seemingly traumatic injuries, such as that experienced recently by Josh Allen of the Buffalo Bills who’s head bounced dramatically off the turf in a Sunday game. As if the injury itself wasn’t startling enough, Allen was cleared to... MORE

Stuck in the middle: patellar tracking and pain

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Common in runners and cyclists, patellofemoral pain (PFP) results from improper tracking of the patella along the trochlear groove of the femur (see figure 1). Many implicate vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) weakness as the cause of the patella sliding astray as the knee flexes and extends. As Chris Mallac explains, however, researchers lack a full... MORE

Spotting zebras

in Ankle and foot injuries, Email Newsletters

Sports injuries are pretty predictable. Pitchers injure their shoulders, soccer players tear structures in their knees, and runners pull their hamstrings.  Sure, the circumstances change and each athlete comes with an established set of habits, strengths, weakness, and movement patterns. By and large, there’s not much variability, until the day a zebra walks into your... MORE

Under pressure!

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Overuse injuries

A leg cramp is maddening but repeated leg pain on exertion halts an athlete’s progress and performance. Such is the case with chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), the topic of today’s feature article. Physiotherapist Chris Mallac highlights this frustrating syndrome, including the theories about why it happens in the first place. Although several theories of etiology... MORE

Rollin,’ rollin’, rolling!

in Email Newsletters, Tools and technology

The foam roller emerged on the therapeutic scene over five years ago, and has recently become one of the hottest fitness trends, making it into the ‘top 20’ in the United States for the last two years1. Touted for its effectiveness in decreasing muscle soreness and treating trigger points, health clubs even offer foam rolling... MORE

More power to your elbow!

in Elbow and arm injuries, Email Newsletters, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries

Elbow pain is usually fairly straight forward, either occurring on the medial side or the lateral side. Unfortunately, that’s where the simplicity ends. Lateral epicondylitis (LE), also known as tennis elbow, is a chronic condition that plagues racquet sport athletes, archers, and shooters. Today’s feature article, by physiotherapist Trevor Langford, explores the diagnosis and rehabilitation... MORE

Play it again, Sam.

in Email Newsletters, Sports psychology

Humphrey Bogart never said, “Play it again, Sam.” In fact, the line his character Rick says in the movie Casablanca is, “Play it!” This may be the best way for us to approach return to sport (RTS) with athletes: “Play it!” Often, more is made of the ‘return’ portion rather than the ‘sport.’ What I... MORE

A pain in the neck

in Email Newsletters, Neck and back injuries

We’re excited about our recent announcement to transition our subscription model to a web-based publication! This offers our readers the opportunity to access our content from any smart device. The downside of mobile reading is a phenomenon called ‘text neck’.   Rest assured that the cervical spine is made to endure flexed positions for prolonged... MORE


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