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10/24/2018 | Diagnose & Treat

A clinicians guide to side strains in cricket fast...

Adam Smith describes the patho-anatomy of a side strain and outlines clinical tests to assess, treat and determine readiness for return to play for a cricket fast bowler. Side strains have been reported in a variety of sports, including javelin throwers, baseball pitchers, tennis players, golfers, and cricketers. This article, however, focuses on side strains... MORE

Joint injuries


08/29/2019 | Shoulder injuries

Frozen shoulder: new solutions to a sticky issue?

In the first of this 2-part article, Andrew Hamilton discussed the etiology of ‘frozen shoulder’ and the efficacy of conservative treatment options. In part two, Andrew examines the evidence for the benefits or otherwise of newer, more technological therapies for this condition including pulsed radiofrequency therapy and guided ultrasound. As we saw in part one of... MORE

01/23/2019 | Shoulder injuries

Sternoclavicular joint dysfunction: a rare diagnosis

Trevor Langford reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the sternoclavicular joint, explains how joint dysfunction presents in athletes and non-athletes, and provides treatment options for a sternoclavicular joint sprain or dislocation. Injuries of the glenohumeral joint (GHJ) and the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) are commonly diagnosed, while injury to the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is frequently overlooked during... MORE

12/31/2018 | Ankle and foot injuries

Sinus tarsi syndrome: a possible source of lateral ankle...

Chris Mallac explains the etiology of sinus tarsi syndrome, and outlines diagnosis and management options for clinicians. Sinus tarsi syndrome (STS) is a frequently misdiagnosed condition in which patients have pain over the lateral aspect of the ankle (the sinus tarsi region) with an ‘unstable’ sensation in the rearfoot. STS sufferers usually have a history... MORE

Diagnose & Treat


11/16/2019 | Elbow and arm injuries

Uncommon injuries: Posterior interosseous nerve dysfunction – a cause...

Lateral elbow and forearm pain can be maddening for racket athletes. In part I of this series on posterior interosseous nerve dysfunction, Chris Mallac explains how PIN injuries differ from typical ‘tennis elbow’ and offers thoughts on the differential diagnosis of forearm pain in athletes.  Lateral elbow pain around the extensor compartment of the forearm is typically attributed... MORE

11/8/2019 | Shoulder injuries

Uncommon injuries: Pec minor – a diagnostic dilemma

Isolated pec minor injuries are rare, but present a diagnostic dilemma when they do occur. Andrew Hamilton explains how clinicians can diagnose and treat these injuries in athletes. A variety of conditions cause musculoskeletal shoulder pain which radiates to the anterior chest. These include contusions from trauma, costochondritis, pectoralis muscle strains, and tendon rupture. However, while rare... MORE

10/25/2019 | Uncommon injuries

Uncommon Injuries: Subcoracoid impingement

Chris Mallac explores the anatomy and biomechanics of subcoracoid impingement syndrome, including how clinicians can diagnose and most effectively manage this condition. Sub-coracoid impingement (SCI) syndromes are an uncommon cause of anterior shoulder pain in the athlete; the prevalence in the general population who complain of anterior shoulder pain is approximately 5%(1). Although originally identified... MORE


12/3/2019 | Email Newsletters

Cold water immersion cools muscle growth

When training athletes, resistance training should be executed with the same zeal and importance as skill and endurance training. However, this is rarely the case. Athletes tend to enjoy playing the sport the most and therefore gravitate toward drills and endurance play. Some find being stuck in the weight room boring and fail to see... MORE

11/22/2019 | Improve

3 considerations for return-to-sport decision making

How soon can an athlete return to sport? Tracy Ward looks at the best-practice research and comes up with three guidelines for clinicians. Returning an athlete to sport following an injury requires clinicians to be part of a decision-making team. While they must ensure adequate rehabilitation, they must also weigh the negative consequences of keeping... MORE

11/20/2019 | Email Newsletters

Run of the mill injuries for track and field...

Common sense tells us that athletes who play certain sports tend to suffer particular injuries. However, we lack the data to substantiate which athletes have more particular injury prevention needs. A group of researchers from France undertook the monumental task of surveying the injuries from international track and field championships and categorizing them according to... MORE


11/27/2019

The 4 mechanism of shoulder injuries in rugby union...

A significant aspect of sports injury prevention is understanding the mechanism of injury. Knowing how the damage occurs leads to the development of strategies, such as increased strength or flexibility, which help the athlete either avoid the injury situation or cope with the incident in a better way. Researchers in Dublin sought such information regarding... MORE

11/6/2019

Is playing soccer bad for your brain?

Soccer is the world’s most-played sport. More than 265 million people play soccer each year(1). The number of soccer-related injuries is growing along with the numbers of players. Nearly one-quarter of these injuries are concussions. Of these, almost one-third are related to heading the ball. The rest of the injuries are the result of player-to-player... MORE

10/29/2019

Treat the film or the feeling – a review...

Recreational running is simultaneously held to be the savior of our inactive population and the cause of most musculoskeletal woes. Which is true?  Two late-2019 studies present interesting perspectives on this issue. The first, conducted by the Department of Sports Medicine at Goethe University in Frankfurt, surveyed 720 runners participating in a corporate-sponsored 3.5-mile run(1).... MORE

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