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04/14/2020 | Email Newsletters

Cardiac considerations for post-COVID-19 rehabilitation

Each day brings new information about the effects of the coronavirus. As patients who survive go home from the hospital, more details about their rehabilitation needs are revealed. Many will suffer from deconditioning due to lengthy hospitalizations, or worse, prolonged organ damage. News reports that home deaths are on the rise lead one to believe... MORE

04/8/2020 | Other

Post-Covid-19 rehab for athletes: start with pulmonary function

The coronavirus shows no partiality in it’s spread. While devastating to the elderly population, it infects even the fittest athletes. Though those with underlying medical conditions fare worse when infected, the virus causes even previously healthy people to become quite ill. On the other hand, the disease is barely noticeable in some people. The tricky... MORE

Joint injuries


01/28/2020 | Email Newsletters

47% of ACLR patients who can SLS still have...

The high rate of reinjury after anterior cruciate ligament repair (ACLR) makes it essential that clinicians accurately assess an athlete’s readiness to return to sport (RTS). Many factors play a role in RTS decision making, not the least of which is knee extensor strength. Regaining quadriceps strength is one of the most challenging aspects of... MORE

12/13/2019 | Uncommon injuries

Uncommon injuries: Pes anserinus part II – the road...

In the first part of this series, Andrew Hamilton outlined the structure of the pes anserinus complex, the risk factors for injury, and the diagnostic criteria. In the second and final part, he explores the most effective treatment options and rehab protocols for athletes suffering from a pes injury. As explained in part one of this... MORE

11/12/2019 | Email Newsletters

Evidence doesn’t equal symptoms. Get the picture?

The sports medicine industry is lately taking a hard look at the reliance on imaging for diagnosis, as well they should. Diagnostic imaging has become a multi-billion dollar industry in the United States(1). The dependence on imaging for clinical decision making decreases the amount of time the practitioners spend with patients and possibly the number... MORE

Diagnose & Treat


08/14/2020 | Cardiopulmonary

Sudden cardiac death in athletes: how useful is...

Athletes who contract COVID-19 may be at an increased risk for the development of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. As many athletes seek to return to sport, Andrew Hamilton looks at sudden cardiac death in athletes and considers the evidence for the most effective and appropriate pre-exercise cardiac screening interventions. Although the actual incidence of sudden death... MORE

08/7/2020 | Knee injuries

Cyclops lesions after ACL reconstruction: something to keep an...

Cyclops lesions are a common cause of range of motion limitations after ACL reconstruction. Chris Mallac defines the malady, explores the causes, and suggests ways to prevent this syndrome from occurring.  First described in 1990 by Jackson and Schaefer(1), a cyclops lesion is a reasonably common complication following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), with the... MORE

07/10/2020 | Leg injuries

Tibialis anterior herniation in the athlete: a fascial defect...

Although rare, herniation of the tibialis anterior muscle may be more common than previously thought. Andrew Hamilton explores the causes, diagnosis, and treatment options for this injury. Muscle herniation, also known as a myofascial defect, is the protrusion of a muscle through the surrounding fascia. The most common location of muscle herniation is in the... MORE


08/5/2020 | Email Newsletters

Why inflammation after muscle injury isn’t a bad thing

Inflammation is having a moment. Perhaps due to COVID-19 and the puzzling inflammatory cascade, all health practitioners are diving a bit deeper into the role of inflammation in illness and healing. With that in mind, we present this review of the function of inflammation in acute musculoskeletal injuries. An understanding of injury starts with a... MORE

07/31/2020 | Improve

Good talk: why verbal feedback matters

Trevor Langford explores practical methods for assessing specific sporting movements, and how appropriate feedback can help an athlete improve movement quality. Athletes frequently train under stress and fatigue, which can lead to low motivation and poorly executed techniques(1). Fortunately, verbal and kinematic feedback related to technique execution enhances performance in athletes who are less conscientious(2).... MORE

07/16/2020 | Improve

Making the most of multidisciplinary teams

In a post-pandemic world, multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) become more important as sports professionals navigate best practices for their athletes to return to play. While they seem like a great idea, MDTs may lose their luster once you’re in the trenches. Jason Tee explains the intricacy and finesse required to fashion an MDT that provides the best outcomes for athletes.... MORE


08/11/2020

Hop to it: adding a single-leg vertical hop to...

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears continue to plague athletes in greater numbers each year(1). Unlike some athletic injuries, ACL tears, once healed or repaired, continue to impact future physical activity and joint health. A majority of athletes (around 60%) never return to a competitive level of sport(1). While there may be several reasons for this,... MORE

07/28/2020

Beyond hamstring curls: effective recruitment with hip extension and...

Studies looking at muscle activation often rely on surface electromyography (sEMG) readings to determine muscle functionality. New technology, however, enables scientists to get a more accurate picture of muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a better measurement of muscle activation by recording the T2 relaxation time of tissue water. Scientists from Australia used... MORE

07/21/2020

3 things to watch for in athletes with femoroacetabular...

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) primarily strikes young male athletes. The syndrome is often best managed with surgical correction. However, it’s important to understand how FAI affects the biomechanics of those who try a conservative approach. Researchers at Marquette University realized that gait assessment alone doesn’t mimic the extreme hip motion needed in sport(1). Therefore, they enrolled... MORE

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