BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Search Results for: injury prevention

Do injury prevention programs work for women?

More women are playing soccer than ever before. In fact, the rate of females joining soccer teams is outpacing the growth of all other sports(1). Injuries from playing soccer are on the rise as well. According to the NCAA, injuries occurred in collegiate female soccer players between 2004 and 2009, at a rate of 7.3... MORE

Beyond 11+: How to design a meaningful injury prevention...

Jason Tee discusses injury prevention strategies and why a ‘one size fits all’ may not be the best approach. Sports injury results in real economic costs for participants (hospitalization, doctor’s appointments, physiotherapy), as well as time off from work and school for participants hurt while playing sport. In professional sport, the stakes are even higher!... MORE

Injury prevention: shoe facts, shoe fiction

How does running shoe design and construction affect injury risk, and how does this affect advice on shoe choices that clinicians give to their injured runners? Andrew Hamilton looks at what the recent research has to say. Running is one of the most popular sports and fitness activities across the globe. However, while it is a... MORE

Injury prevention strategies for return to sport

Sports injuries continue to remain high and frequent across many sports and directly affect an athlete’s performance. Tracy Ward looks at the latest findings on injury prevention strategies and offers suggestions for implementation. Sports injuries impact an athlete’s performance, cause a reduction in participation time, affect team performance, impose a financial burden to both them and... MORE

The modern golfer Part I: the biomechanics of injury...

In the first of a 2-part article, Pat Gilham explores the biomechanics of the golf swing and the implications for prevention. The golf swing is a multi-segmented and complex skill, which involves accurate body perception and well-coordinated muscular actions(1). It involves a kinetic chain initiated from movement of the legs and hips followed by the trunk... MORE

Snow sports: time to think about injury prevention

Andrew Hamilton looks at what the scientific research has to say regarding snow sports injury and injury prevention. Skiing and (increasingly) snowboarding are becoming mass-participation sports, enjoyed by participants of all ages and abilities. For example, in North America alone, there are more than 78 million annual visits to ski areas by skiers and snowboarders of... MORE

Running injury rehabilitation: build tolerance through loading

In the second part of this two-part article, Tracy Ward reviews the best-practice, home-executed loading techniques for runners seeking a return to sport following injury. Returning to running following an injury is a complex process that requires careful planning and monitoring. The most common running-related injuries are medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis,... MORE

Transition to training after COVID-19: helping athletes avoid post-lockdown...

Several weeks into concerted efforts to keep everyone socially distanced to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus in the United States, many states are easing restrictions on residents. With parks opening and commerce resuming, athletes are eager to return to the gym and training. What have they lost and how much training they have... MORE

Muscle strain injury: time to consider the fascia?

Andrew Hamilton looks at recent evidence suggesting that fascial tissue damage may play a significant role in muscle strain injury, and the potential implications for clinicians treating these kinds of injuries in athletes. Muscle strain injuries frequently occur in athletes. In ball-sports (soccer, rugby, basketball, football etc), they are among the most common of all... MORE

Injury niggles: manage small problems for a big difference

Jason Tee explains why classifying athletes as injured or uninjured may be too simplistic and how addressing niggling injuries could improve outcomes in the longer term. Niggles are an accepted consequence of sports participation. Even though athletes accumulate many aches and pains through their endeavors, most agree that the benefits of sport participation outweigh the... MORE

Follow us