BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

Divide and conquer: using subgroups to manage Achilles tendinopathy

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Leg injuries, Overuse injuries

Achilles tendinopathy is a common yet complex condition to treat. New findings suggest subgrouping patients could enhance treatment and recovery. Tracy Ward recaps tendon pathology and explains how subgrouping athletes may improve clinical outcomes. Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is one of the most common overuse injuries, with a prevalence rate of approximately 10%(1). The injury usually... MORE

Hamstring intramuscular tendon injury RTP decision-making: Does a picture...

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Musculoskeletal injuries

Paper title: Complete resolution of a hamstring intramuscular tendon injury on MRI is not necessary for a clinically successful return to play. Publication: British Journal of Sports Medicine 2021;55:397-402. Publication date: April 2021. INTRODUCTION Hamstring injuries make up a significant percentage of acute, sports-related musculoskeletal injuries. There is ongoing debate regarding the return to play (RTP) decision-making criteria. The... MORE

Functional ankle instability: jumping for joy?

in Anatomy, Ankle and foot injuries, Prevent, Proprioception and balance

New research suggests that the addition of plyometric training for ankle injury rehabilitation improves proprioception in athletes with functional ankle instability. Andrew Hamilton explains why introducing ballistic exercises into rehabilitation may improve functional outcomes. Ankle sprains are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries in sportsmen and women. Up to 45% of sports injuries may be related to... MORE

Obsessing about Osteochondritis Dissecans

in Anatomy, Knee injuries, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab

Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a pathological entity initially presenting as vague internal knee pain. Chris Mallac takes a deep dive into OCD and uncovers the clinical presentation and management. Introduction Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) primarily occurs when the subchondral bone undergoes blood flow disruption leading to ischemia and damage. It may present as... MORE

Getting to grips with the distal radioulnar joint

in Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Hand injuries, Joint injuries

Wrist injuries account for 3-9% of all sports injuries(1). Chris Mallac gets to grips with distal radioulnar joint injuries and discusses the presentation, diagnosis, and management in clinical practice.  Anatomy and Biomechanics The distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) allows pronation and supination of the forearm. Along with the proximal radioulnar joint (PRUJ), these two uniaxial pivot... MORE

A hop, skip, and a jump: restoring function following...

in Acute injuries, Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Knee injuries, Musculoskeletal injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Uncommon injuries

Patellar tendon ruptures are rare, and the evidence guiding rehabilitation is not clear. With this in mind, Trevor Langford reviews the predisposing factors, clinical presentation, and rehabilitation options in patellar tendon rupture repairs. With an incidence of 0.6%, a healthy patellar tendon rupture is rare(1). Patellar tendon ruptures (PTR) are often the result of trauma (direct or... MORE

Patellofemoral pain syndrome: is it okay to use lunges?

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Paper title: Patellofemoral joint loading during the forward and backward lunge Publication: Physical Therapy in Sport. Jan 2021; Vol. 47, Pages 178-184 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2020.12.001 Publication date: Jan 2021 INTRODUCTION Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common causes of knee pain in young athletes. It usually presents as anterior and retro-patellar knee pain made... MORE

Uncommon injuries: posterior cruciate ligament tears

in Diagnose & Treat, Knee injuries

Posterior cruciate ligament injuries are rare. Thus, many clinicians lack the experience and protocols to manage them. Trevor Langford reviews the anatomy, biomechanics, and mechanism of injury of the PCL and covers the rehabilitation plan for isolated PCL injuries.  Introduction The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest intraarticular ligament of the knee and a... MORE

Sure footing: why the foot is the foundation of...

in Ankle and foot injuries, Diagnose & Treat

The balance of the articular and muscular systems within the foot and ankle complex is crucial for optimal loading to withstand sporting demands. Tracy Ward explains the architecture, biomechanics, and clinical application to build the foundation from the foot up. The foot and ankle complex controls balance and posture and counteracts gravitational forces. The body’s... MORE

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