BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

Navicular stress fracture: a high-impact risk for young athletes

in Ankle and foot injuries, Diagnose & Treat

Chris Mallac investigates the causes, diagnosis, and management of navicular stress fractures in athletes. First described by Towne and colleagues in 1970(1), stress fractures of the navicular bone are uncommon in the general population. However, male athletes in their mid-20s participating in sports such as sprinting, middle distance running, hurdling, and basketball are more at... MORE

Fractures of the Proximal 5th Metatarsal in Athletes

in Ankle and foot injuries, Diagnose & Treat

Chris Mallac explores the etiology and classification of 5th metatarsal fractures in athletes, provides diagnostic guidance, and available treatment options. First described in 1903 by Sir Robert Jones(1), fractures of the fifth metatarsal (MET) are relatively common fractures of the foot(2). The estimated incidence of fifth MET fracture is 1.8 per 1000 person-years(3,4), and 68%... MORE

Muscle strain injury: time to consider the fascia?

in Anatomy, Musculoskeletal injuries

Andrew Hamilton looks at recent evidence suggesting that fascial tissue damage may play a significant role in muscle strain injury, and the potential implications for clinicians treating these kinds of injuries in athletes. Muscle strain injuries frequently occur in athletes. In ball-sports (soccer, rugby, basketball, football etc), they are among the most common of all... MORE

How reliable is the gait lab in your pocket?

in Knee injuries, Tools and technology

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) plagues up to 17% of runners who complain of knee pain(1). Often weak gluteus medius muscles are to blame with resulting hip adduction (HADD) and positive Trendelenburg sign during the unilateral stance phase of running. Patellofemoral pain also affects knee flexion (KFLEX) in single stance, with runners avoiding KFLEX to prevent pain.... MORE

Plantaris tendon: the nuisance bystander?

in Diagnose & Treat, Leg injuries

The plantaris muscle and tendon are considered unnecessary for the biomechanical function of the lower limb. Yet this benign muscle can cause problems if ruptured or involved in a medial Achilles tendon injury. Chris Mallac explains why, and how to manage an injury to either. The plantaris muscle (PM) is a small, thin, and spindle-shaped muscle... MORE

6 recommendations for the treatment of hip pain

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Hip pain in active adults is common. Between 30% to 40% of adult athletes report chronic hip pain(1,2).  Hip pain doesn’t just affect athletes. The number of adults in the general population diagnosed with femoroacetabular impingement is 10% to 15%(3). Many with hip pain seek the help of a physiotherapist. Therefore, in 2017 a group... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Proximal hamstring rupture – act sooner rather...

in Anatomy, Leg injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac looks at the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for proximal hamstring ruptures in athletes. Although an uncommon form of hamstring damage (only eight to 12% of all hamstring injuries), an untreated rupture at the muscle origin leads to significant functional debilitation(1-3). The actual incidence of undiagnosed rupture may be much higher, thus accounting... MORE

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