BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

The 4 mechanism of shoulder injuries in rugby union...

in Email Newsletters, Shoulder injuries

A significant aspect of sports injury prevention is understanding the mechanism of injury. Knowing how the damage occurs leads to the development of strategies, such as increased strength or flexibility, which help the athlete either avoid the injury situation or cope with the incident in a better way. Researchers in Dublin sought such information regarding... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Posterior interosseous nerve dysfunction – a cause...

in Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Elbow and arm injuries

Lateral elbow and forearm pain can be maddening for racket athletes. In part I of this series on posterior interosseous nerve dysfunction, Chris Mallac explains how PIN injuries differ from typical ‘tennis elbow’ and offers thoughts on the differential diagnosis of forearm pain in athletes.  Lateral elbow pain around the extensor compartment of the forearm is typically attributed... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Pec minor – a diagnostic dilemma

in Diagnose & Treat, Shoulder injuries

Isolated pec minor injuries are rare, but present a diagnostic dilemma when they do occur. Andrew Hamilton explains how clinicians can diagnose and treat these injuries in athletes. A variety of conditions cause musculoskeletal shoulder pain which radiates to the anterior chest. These include contusions from trauma, costochondritis, pectoralis muscle strains, and tendon rupture. However, while rare... MORE

Uncommon Injuries: Subcoracoid impingement

in Diagnose & Treat, Shoulder injuries, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac explores the anatomy and biomechanics of subcoracoid impingement syndrome, including how clinicians can diagnose and most effectively manage this condition. Sub-coracoid impingement (SCI) syndromes are an uncommon cause of anterior shoulder pain in the athlete; the prevalence in the general population who complain of anterior shoulder pain is approximately 5%(1). Although originally identified... MORE

Walk it off! Guidelines for preventing overdiagnosis

in Ankle and foot injuries, Email Newsletters, Improve, Prevent

The British Journal of Medicine published two interesting articles this month. The first is an education review on the overdiagnosis and medicalization of athletes (and the public at large)(1). The authors cite several factors supporting this trend in sports medicine, including: The belief that more intervention improves outcomes. Making the definition of disease more inclusive.... MORE

Perineal injury: release the pressure

in Anatomy, Core injuries, Prevent

Andrew Hamilton investigates the causes of perineal injury in cyclists and what the science says about reducing injury risk. Compared to many sports, cycling carries a relatively low risk of injury, thanks largely to the smooth, impact-free, and supported nature of the pedaling action. However, the interface between the cyclist and the bike (at the handlebars,... MORE

Jumping to conclusions about anterior knee pain

in Diagnose & Treat, Knee injuries

Jumper’s knee occurs in 14% of athletes, mostly volleyball, basketball, and handball players(1). The term ‘jumper’s knee’ typically refers to anterior knee pain, usually presumed as patellar tendinopathy. However, a careful history and exam reveal that quadriceps tendinopathy exists in up to 25% of patients. These athletes complain of anterior knee pain at the superiorpole... MORE

Taking a crack at groin pain

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Groin pain accounts for up to 30% of all sports injuries(1). Treating this ailment requires careful sleuthing from the sports injury clinician. The list of differential diagnoses to consider for groin pain is lengthy, including: Hip, pelvic, or knee joint pathology Bone pathology Tendon or ligament strain Muscle belly strain or tear Sports hernia Abdominal... MORE

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