BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

The effect of hip position during Nordic hamstring exercises

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries

Athletes who play field sports that require repetitive sprinting are susceptible to suffering a hamstring strain. For the various elite football and rugby codes, a protracted hamstring injury can sideline a player for a significant amount of time, impacts team performance, and results in monetary losses. Therefore, hamstring strain prevention is a salient topic in... MORE

Driving a wedge between orthotics and illiotibial band strain

in Hip injuries, Knee injuries

Illiotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is a common disorder amongst recreational and competitive runners. In fact, it ranks only behind patellofemoral pain syndrome in frequency(1). The iliotibial band (ITB), a tough band of connective tissue that runs from the hip to the lateral knee, serves as the attachment for the gluteus maximus and the tensor fascia... MORE

Lumbar transverse process fracture in sport: rare or...

in Diagnose & Treat, Neck and back injuries

Fractures of the lumbar transverse process can occur during a sporting activity and may be more common than thought. Andrew Hamilton explains and provides some guidelines for clinicians. Most of the reported transverse process fractures (TPFs) result from high-impact traumas, such as traffic accidents(1-4). The high-energy traumas that cause TPF fractures usually also result in... MORE

Mind the gap: Diastasis recti in postpartum athletes

in Core injuries, Improve, Prevent

Tracy Ward explains why even elite athletes can suffer from diastasis recti during the postpartum period, and how clinicians can comprehensively assess and treat this condition. Female athletes often experience the peak of their physical performance and their optimal fertile age simultaneously. Many female athletes continue to train during pregnancy and the postpartum period –... MORE

Hop to it: adding a single-leg vertical hop to...

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears continue to plague athletes in greater numbers each year(1). Unlike some athletic injuries, ACL tears, once healed or repaired, continue to impact future physical activity and joint health. A majority of athletes (around 60%) never return to a competitive level of sport(1). While there may be several reasons for this,... MORE

Cyclops lesions after ACL reconstruction: something to keep an...

in Diagnose & Treat, Knee injuries

Cyclops lesions are a common cause of range of motion limitations after ACL reconstruction. Chris Mallac defines the malady, explores the causes, and suggests ways to prevent this syndrome from occurring.  First described in 1990 by Jackson and Schaefer(1), a cyclops lesion is a reasonably common complication following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), with the... MORE

Beyond hamstring curls: effective recruitment with hip extension and...

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Prevent

Studies looking at muscle activation often rely on surface electromyography (sEMG) readings to determine muscle functionality. New technology, however, enables scientists to get a more accurate picture of muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a better measurement of muscle activation by recording the T2 relaxation time of tissue water. Scientists from Australia used... MORE

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