BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Anatomy

Hop to it: adding a single-leg vertical hop to...

in Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears continue to plague athletes in greater numbers each year(1). Unlike some athletic injuries, ACL tears, once healed or repaired, continue to impact future physical activity and joint health. A majority of athletes (around 60%) never return to a competitive level of sport(1). While there may be several reasons for this,... MORE

Cyclops lesions after ACL reconstruction: something to keep an...

in Diagnose & Treat, Knee injuries

Cyclops lesions are a common cause of range of motion limitations after ACL reconstruction. Chris Mallac defines the malady, explores the causes, and suggests ways to prevent this syndrome from occurring.  First described in 1990 by Jackson and Schaefer(1), a cyclops lesion is a reasonably common complication following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), with the... MORE

Beyond hamstring curls: effective recruitment with hip extension and...

in Email Newsletters, Leg injuries, Prevent

Studies looking at muscle activation often rely on surface electromyography (sEMG) readings to determine muscle functionality. New technology, however, enables scientists to get a more accurate picture of muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a better measurement of muscle activation by recording the T2 relaxation time of tissue water. Scientists from Australia used... MORE

Adductor rehab: keep on the ball with a criteria-based...

in Diagnose & Treat, Leg injuries

Tracy Ward presents a criteria-based rehabilitation plan for returning to sport post-adductor injury and how this protocol can reduce days lost to injury. Athletes forced into isolation and withdrawn from contact exposure due to COVID-19 face an uphill challenge to return to professional levels of play and competition. With soccer as one of the first... MORE

3 things to watch for in athletes with femoroacetabular...

in Email Newsletters, Hip injuries

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) primarily strikes young male athletes. The syndrome is often best managed with surgical correction. However, it’s important to understand how FAI affects the biomechanics of those who try a conservative approach. Researchers at Marquette University realized that gait assessment alone doesn’t mimic the extreme hip motion needed in sport(1). Therefore, they enrolled... MORE

Serratus anterior and the overhead athlete: Part II –...

in Diagnose & Treat, Shoulder injuries

In the second part of this two-part series, Chris Mallac highlights some clinically relevant exercises designed to retrain serratus anterior function. Overhead athletes need stable shoulders. Their power and performance comes directly from the stability and mobility offered in this joint. As reviewed in part I of this series, the serratus anterior (SA) helps stabilize... MORE

Growing Pains: Osgood-Schlatter Disease

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Knee injuries

Adolescence is often a period of rapid growth for most children. Because bones grow faster than muscles, this growth can lead to tension from the tendons at their insertion on the bone, causing an apophysitis. One of the most difficult-to-treat conditions related to such growth is Osgood-Schlatter Disease (OSD), an apophysitis at the tibial tuberosity.... MORE

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