BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Chris Mallac

Chris is a highly qualified Physiotherapist and Human Movement Educator with extensive experience in elite level sport. He has worked with elite level State and National level AFL, rugby union and football teams in Australia, UK and France, more recently as High Performance Manager for the Brisbane Roar in the Australian A-League Football Competition.

He still travels the world presenting Rehab Trainer courses and also works as a Physiotherapist and Educational Consultant with Inspire Health Services in Brisbane, Australia.



Articles by Chris Mallac

Serratus anterior and the overhead athlete: Part II –...

in Diagnose & Treat, Shoulder injuries

In the second part of this two-part series, Chris Mallac highlights some clinically relevant exercises designed to retrain serratus anterior function. Overhead athletes need stable shoulders. Their power and performance comes directly from the stability and mobility offered in this joint. As reviewed in part I of this series, the serratus anterior (SA) helps stabilize... MORE

Navicular stress fracture: a high-impact risk for young athletes

in Ankle and foot injuries, Diagnose & Treat

Chris Mallac investigates the causes, diagnosis, and management of navicular stress fractures in athletes. First described by Towne and colleagues in 1970(1), stress fractures of the navicular bone are uncommon in the general population. However, male athletes in their mid-20s participating in sports such as sprinting, middle distance running, hurdling, and basketball are more at... MORE

Fractures of the Proximal 5th Metatarsal in Athletes

in Ankle and foot injuries, Diagnose & Treat

Chris Mallac explores the etiology and classification of 5th metatarsal fractures in athletes, provides diagnostic guidance, and available treatment options. First described in 1903 by Sir Robert Jones(1), fractures of the fifth metatarsal (MET) are relatively common fractures of the foot(2). The estimated incidence of fifth MET fracture is 1.8 per 1000 person-years(3,4), and 68%... MORE

Plantaris tendon: the nuisance bystander?

in Diagnose & Treat, Leg injuries

The plantaris muscle and tendon are considered unnecessary for the biomechanical function of the lower limb. Yet this benign muscle can cause problems if ruptured or involved in a medial Achilles tendon injury. Chris Mallac explains why, and how to manage an injury to either. The plantaris muscle (PM) is a small, thin, and spindle-shaped muscle... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Proximal hamstring rupture – act sooner rather...

in Anatomy, Leg injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac looks at the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for proximal hamstring ruptures in athletes. Although an uncommon form of hamstring damage (only eight to 12% of all hamstring injuries), an untreated rupture at the muscle origin leads to significant functional debilitation(1-3). The actual incidence of undiagnosed rupture may be much higher, thus accounting... MORE

Neuroplasticity part II: brain matters for effective rehab

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve

In part one of this 2-part series on the importance of neuroplasticity in sports injury rehab, Chris Mallac explained how the ability of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum to reorganize and adapt has implications for athletes in the context of skill acquisition for an effective return to sport. In part two, Chris explores more key... MORE

Neuroplasticity in sports injury rehabilitation: Part I

in Anatomy, Improve

In the first part of a 2-part article, Chris Mallac explores the concept of neuroplasticity, and how a better understanding of its underlying principles improves rehab outcomes. Reinjury rates following return to sport are often quite high. In under-25 athletes for example, the incidence of another anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture (or ACL failure) run... MORE

Neuro-dynamics: mobilizing the athlete back to full function and...

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac explores the current understanding of nerve mobility and the implications for clinicians treating athletes in their care. David Butler and Michael Shacklock coined the terms neuro-dynamics or neuro-mobilizations to describe the concept that impaired neural movement can cause limitations in the range of motion in the body(1-3). Subsequent research has supported the hypothesis that... MORE

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