BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Overuse injuries

Overuse injuries occur as a result of repetitive trauma (microtrauma) as opposed to acute injuries from a single trauma (macrotrauma).

Muscle and joint injuries like tendinitis and stress fractures are often a result of microtrauma and are often caused by errors in training or technique.

Where training is the cause, athletes often take on too much, too quickly while errors in technique can lead to persistent overloading of a muscle or joint.

Listen up! Athlete voices in injury rehabilitation

in Acute injuries, Improve, Joint injuries, Musculoskeletal injuries, Other, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Prevent, Sports psychology

Sports injury research typically focuses on objective, anonymous outcomes to remove the subjectivity of human ‘error.’ However, what if the ‘error’ is removing the human element that is the athlete? Jason Tee explores listening to the athlete’s voice to improve outcomes and avoid the pitfalls of a one-size-fits-all approach. For too long, sports and injury... MORE

Exercise monitoring for a stellar innings

in Improve, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries, Prevent, Tools and technology

Exercise monitoring is an important factor in injury prevention. However, cricket is a sport with vastly different positional demands, thus making load monitoring challenging within a team environment. Candice MacMillan discusses how practitioners can quantify external and internal factors to improve athlete monitoring within cricket. Practitioners define workload as “the amount of stress placed on... MORE

A tale of two halves: the differences in muscle...

in Acute injuries, Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Female Athletes, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab

Paper title: Assessing the differences in muscle stiffness measured with shear wave elastography and myotonometer during the menstrual cycle in young women Publication: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging Publication date: May 2022 INTRODUCTION One of the most important factors in maintaining dynamic knee stability is muscle stiffness, which is proportional to muscle fiber recruitment and... MORE

Navigating sports medicine’s ‘Bermuda Triangle’ – part II

in Acute injuries, Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Proprioception and balance, Strength

In Part II of navigating athletic groin pain, Candice MacMillan outlines the treatment and rehabilitation of these injuries in the context of the control-chaos continuum. Athletic groin pain (AGP) is common among athletes participating in soccer, Australian rules football, Gaelic football, ice hockey, and rugby union(1,2). Traditionally, practitioners consider AGP as the ‘Bermuda Triangle’ of... MORE

Navigating Sports Medicine’s ‘Bermuda Triangle’ – Part I

in Acute injuries, Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Prevent

Groin pain remains a challenging sports injury to manage. The complex regional anatomy provides practitioners with the unenviable task of diagnosing and managing athletes with groin pain. However, a universal terminology and taxonomy would assist practitioners in diagnosing and managing these athletes through the return to play process. In part I, Candice MacMillan discusses the... MORE

Cover me! Understanding dermatology in Sports and Exercise Medicine...

in Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Masterclass, Other, Overuse injuries, Prevent, Uncommon injuries

Dermatoses describe any skin defect or lesion on the skin, and clinicians categorize them according to etiology. Furthermore, clinicians may divide dermatoses into two groups, those caused by or those aggravated by sports. In part II, Nella Grilo discusses dermatoses aggravated by sports and identifies how they can directly or indirectly affect athletes’ health and... MORE

Serving up spondyloarthritis: time for a clinical hawkeye

in Anatomy, Diagnose & Treat, Neck and back injuries, Overuse injuries

Spondyloarthritis is an uncommon collection of chronic inflammatory systemic disorders. Athletic populations may be at greater risk of misdiagnosis due to the physical demands of sport and the high prevalence of back pain during peak training or competition periods. Chris Mallac explores spondyloarthritis and provides a management outline for clinicians. Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is an uncommon... MORE

Optimal Loading in Rehabilitation: finding the ‘sweet spot.’

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Musculoskeletal injuries, Other, Overuse injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab

There is an undisputed role for exercise in the early rehabilitative phase of soft tissue injuries. However, exercise prescription remains a challenge. In this article, Eurico Marques provides a framework for creating an individualized exercise prescription – the so-called ‘sweet spot.’ Skeletal muscle injuries occur when an external force overwhelms the muscle’s ability to generate... MORE

Breast support – only the balls should bounce!

in Acute injuries, Diagnose & Treat, Female Athletes, Improve, Musculoskeletal injuries, Other, Overuse injuries

The breast has limited anatomical support and can move 15cm during running. Nicola Brown discusses the consequences of breast movement and provides guidance on obtaining the correct sports bra fit to help women exercise in greater comfort. Introduction The evolution of technology and sportswear aims to improve performance and prevent injuries. However, the sports industry... MORE

Divide and conquer: using subgroups to manage Achilles tendinopathy

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Leg injuries, Overuse injuries

Achilles tendinopathy is a common yet complex condition to treat. New findings suggest subgrouping patients could enhance treatment and recovery. Tracy Ward recaps tendon pathology and explains how subgrouping athletes may improve clinical outcomes. Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is one of the most common overuse injuries, with a prevalence rate of approximately 10%(1). The injury usually... MORE

Follow us