BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Diagnose & Treat

Muscle strain injury: time to consider the fascia?

in Anatomy, Musculoskeletal injuries

Andrew Hamilton looks at recent evidence suggesting that fascial tissue damage may play a significant role in muscle strain injury, and the potential implications for clinicians treating these kinds of injuries in athletes. Muscle strain injuries frequently occur in athletes. In ball-sports (soccer, rugby, basketball, football etc), they are among the most common of all... MORE

Plantaris tendon: the nuisance bystander?

in Diagnose & Treat, Leg injuries

The plantaris muscle and tendon are considered unnecessary for the biomechanical function of the lower limb. Yet this benign muscle can cause problems if ruptured or involved in a medial Achilles tendon injury. Chris Mallac explains why, and how to manage an injury to either. The plantaris muscle (PM) is a small, thin, and spindle-shaped muscle... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Proximal hamstring rupture – act sooner rather...

in Anatomy, Leg injuries, Pre-hab and post-surgical rehab, Uncommon injuries

Chris Mallac looks at the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment options for proximal hamstring ruptures in athletes. Although an uncommon form of hamstring damage (only eight to 12% of all hamstring injuries), an untreated rupture at the muscle origin leads to significant functional debilitation(1-3). The actual incidence of undiagnosed rupture may be much higher, thus accounting... MORE

Uncommon injuries: Don’t play with groin pain – femoral...

in Diagnose & Treat, Hip injuries, Uncommon injuries

Although relatively uncommon in athletes, the risk of a femoral neck stress fracture is nevertheless significant, especially in females. Andrew Hamilton explains the etiology of this debilitating injury, factors that aid a rapid and accurate diagnosis, and the nutritional defecits associated with its development. First reported by Asalin, a German military surgeon in 1905, a... MORE

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