BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

Improve

Taking the headache out of concussion management

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Improve

The days of lying in a dark room until concussion symptoms resolve are over. Research now shows that although exercise may make concussion symptoms worse, finding that sub-threshold level of activity –movement that doesn’t trigger symptoms – may help resolve the effects of a concussion(1). Concussive symptoms can be varied and, as Alicia Filley explains,... MORE

Heat stress in athletes: a hot safety topic!

in Prevent, Tools and technology

Heat-related illness in athletes can have potentially catastrophic consequences. Andrew Hamilton looks at what recent research says about assessing the risks and heat stroke/illness prevention. When it comes to life-threatening conditions associated with sport participation, sudden cardiac arrest, and concussion probably spring to mind. However, although less publicized, heat stroke and heat-related illness are equally serious.... MORE

Who would win: surgery versus physiotherapy for treatment of...

in Diagnose & Treat, Email Newsletters, Improve, Musculoskeletal injuries

  Tendinopathy continues to plague athletes at all levels of sport. As such, it comprises up to 30% of all musculoskeletal complaints seen in general medical practices(1). In a previous article, Alicia Filley explores the combined theory of inflammation and degeneration within an injured tendon. She then reviews the current thinking on the many approaches... MORE

Focus on athletes with ADHD

in Email Newsletters, Sports psychology

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of children diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder  (ADHD) in the United States since the start of the 2000s has increased almost 50%, with some surveys citing the incidence up to 11% in children 4 to 17 years-of-age(1,2). It seems likely, then, that the number... MORE

Plyometric training…when does rehabilitation need a spring in its...

in Improve, Power development, Strength

The debate continues surrounding appropriate timing and volume for implementing plyometric training in return-to-play rehabilitation. Pat Gillham looks at the latest thinking ‘Plyometric exercise’ was a term coined in 1964(1). Plyometrics exercises exploit the benefits of the plyometric regime and involve the Stretch-Shortening Cycle (SSC)(2). Thanks to the muscles’ pre-stimulation during the eccentric phase, plyometrics... MORE

The Athlete’s Pelvic Floor

in Anatomy, Improve, Musculoskeletal injuries, Overuse injuries

Tracy Ward discusses pelvic floor dysfunction in athletes, outlines the implications for rehabilitation, and raises awareness with a view toward prevention. The impact of female pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a hot topic in women’s health but rarely discussed within the context of sport. This oft-ignored problem affects both men and women and impacts an... MORE

Identifying exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction in the breathless athlete

in Diagnose & Treat, Improve, Other

Athletes with asthma are typically encouraged to swim as the humidity helps with their breathing. However, many athletes, including swimmers, continue to struggle with breathlessness during exercise. Alicia Filley explains why for some, breathing remains difficult, painful, and triggers panic attacks, despite treatment with bronchodilators. Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction Historically, athletes who presented with exertional dyspnea,... MORE

Running from injury

in Email Newsletters, Improve

Last year a landmark study revealed that vertical loading forces, long thought the scourge of injured distance and recreational runners, are likely not the causes of repeated injuries(1). Rather, Canadian researchers found that when evaluating kinetic variables in 65 healthy female runners, only peak braking force (PBF) significantly predicted repeated running injury (RRI)(1). Specifically, those... MORE

Follow us