BRINGING SCIENCE TO TREATMENT

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Post COVID-19 return to sport: an update II

in Email Newsletters, Improve

With today’s announcement by Louisiana State University’s head football coach Ed Ogeron that ‘most’ of the team has contracted the novel coronavirus, we’ve yet to realize the impact of COVID-19 on athletes fully. Seventy-five of the Texas Tech football team players have also gotten the virus since returning to school for the fall season. While... MORE

Injury prevention programs: facts and figures for decision-makers

in Improve

Jason Tee provides an evidence-based insight into how clinicians, athletes and coaches can quantify an injury prevention program’s value. Injuries cost athletes and sports teams both time and money. Yet, investment in injury prevention remains the ultimate grudge purchase in the sporting world. Team managers view injury prevention as unexciting, time-consuming, and undependable. However, it... MORE

Beliefs and barriers to injury prevention in recreational runners

in Email Newsletters, Improve, Prevent

Nearly 85% of runners experience a running injury in their lifetime(1). While researchers continue to look for exact mechanisms of injury in runners, a group from the Netherlands investigated the factors that make an injury prevention program successful(1). They undertook a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a multifactorial online prevention program for recreational... MORE

Mind the gap: Diastasis recti in postpartum athletes

in Core injuries, Improve, Prevent

Tracy Ward explains why even elite athletes can suffer from diastasis recti during the postpartum period, and how clinicians can comprehensively assess and treat this condition. Female athletes often experience the peak of their physical performance and their optimal fertile age simultaneously. Many female athletes continue to train during pregnancy and the postpartum period –... MORE

Good talk: why verbal feedback matters

in Improve, Sports psychology

Trevor Langford explores practical methods for assessing specific sporting movements, and how appropriate feedback can help an athlete improve movement quality. Athletes frequently train under stress and fatigue, which can lead to low motivation and poorly executed techniques(1). Fortunately, verbal and kinematic feedback related to technique execution enhances performance in athletes who are less conscientious(2).... MORE

Making the most of multidisciplinary teams

in Improve, Other, Tools and technology

In a post-pandemic world, multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) become more important as sports professionals navigate best practices for their athletes to return to play. While they seem like a great idea, MDTs may lose their luster once you’re in the trenches. Jason Tee explains the intricacy and finesse required to fashion an MDT that provides the best outcomes for athletes.... MORE

4 necessary traits for building better patient/clinician relationships

in Improve, Sports psychology

A therapist’s interaction plays a critical role in patient outcomes. Trevor Langford explores how clinicians can embrace interpersonal aspects of clinical practice to enhance their patient’s rehabilitation experience. Being in pain, out of work, or away from training can be both physically and psychologically debilitating and detrimentally affect a client’s entire well-being and lifestyle. An alliance... MORE

Returning youth to sport following lockdown

in Improve, Prevent, Tools and technology

Jason Tee explains the challenges of returning young athletes to sport safely and efficiently and provides practical guidelines for keeping them injury-free. Many nations are starting to ease strict lockdown rules, allowing life to return to normal after the novel coronavirus pandemic. Professional sportspeople and weekend warriors alike are chomping at the bit to get... MORE

When the world is heavy: the impact of...

in Email Newsletters, Improve

The NCAA reported that there were 81,096 black college athletes during the 2018-2019 academic year(1). These numbers represent 16% of the college athlete population(1). The majority of these athletes play men’s and women’s basketball and men’s football. Of course, many of these go on to play in professional sports. The number of high-school and younger... MORE

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